The two types of financial instruments:

  • Cash instruments — Deposits and loans, commodities, foreign currencies, and securities, such as stocks and bonds.
  • Derivative instruments — Futures, options, swaps and forwards, and assets that get — or derive — their value from the underlying asset they represent. Those assets can include commodities and precious metals, including silver and gold, as well as cash instruments, such as currency, stocks and bonds.

The two asset classes for financial instruments:

  • Equity-based financial instruments — Provide their owners a stake in an enterprise. Most common example: stocks, both common and preferred.
  • Debt-based instruments — Involve loans with interest. Examples: mortgages, bonds, leases and notes.

Most investors tend to get involved with financial instruments by buying the cash varieties, including bonds, stocks and guaranteed investment certificates, or shares in an exchange-traded fund or real estate investment trust.

Investing in derivatives, such as stock options and futures, is more complex because the contracts involved can require investors to buy or sell assets at predetermined times and prices, regardless of their actual market value when the contract comes due.

Some derivatives can be difficult for investors to access because they’re not sold on a centralized exchange, such as the Toronto Stock Exchange. For that reason, they’re called over-the-counter derivatives, and you would need to work with a broker who specializes in them.

Even if you didn’t know the definition of financial instruments until today, you’ve probably been playing them as long as you’ve been investing.

About the Author

Clayton Jarvis

Clayton Jarvis

Reporter

Clayton Jarvis is a mortgage reporter at MoneyWise. Prior to joining the MoneyWise team, Clay wrote for and edited a variety of real estate publications, including Canadian Real Estate Wealth, Real Estate Professional, Mortgage Broker News, Canadian Mortgage Professional, and Mortgage Professional America.

You May Also Like

Canadian Homeowners: There’s Still Time to Save Big By Refinancing Your Mortgage

With mortgage rates near record-lows, you can save lots of money on your home loan.

The Best Tax Software to File With This Season

Maximize your refund using the best tax software for your needs.

Barry Choi: How to Save on Groceries When Prices Are Rising Quickly

Expect to pay nearly $1,000 more at the supermarket this year, food economists say.

New Law Means Significant Tax Relief When You Pass Your Business on to Your Kids

Under the old law, business owners took an extra tax hit if they sold to their children.